CTC News

November 2014: the ins and outs of Canada travel.

Sixth consecutive month of double-digit growth from CTC’s overseas markets was offset by slowdown in US visitors, according to new CTC Tourism Snapshot.

27 January 2015
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November 2014 was a see-saw month for the Canadian travel industry. The continuing positive results from the Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC)’s overseas markets, which registered a 10% rise on the previous year, were counterbalanced by a deceleration in visitors from the US, reports the latest Tourism Snapshot from the (CTC)’s Research department.

Here’s some key data:

  • Just under 815,000 international travellers chose Canada in November 2014, a 0.5% dip over the previous year.
  • Year-to-date November 2014, 16 million consumers have made Canada their vacation destination, a 3% rise.
  • The American market hit the brakes in November 2014: despite a 6% boost in arrivals by air, falls in travellers arriving via auto and other modes of travel—9% and 6% respectively—resulted in an overall 3% decline.
  • Overnight arrivals from the US—seven out of every 10 visitors to Canada—have stagnated in 2014, edging up only 1% in the first 11 months of the year to 11.3 million.
  • The France market was bursting with Gallic pride over its Canadian cousins, posting an 11% leap in visitors across the Atlantic.
  • Elsewhere in CTC’s European markets, the Brits were bullish, taking 6% more trips to Canada in November 2014, while German visitors remained guarded with their travel plans, taking 2% fewer Canadian vacations.
  • The Brazil market seems to have put its World Cup woes behind it, registering an impressive 23% surge in visitors to Canada in November 2014.
  • CTC’s Asian markets were teacher’s pet in November 2014: China (20%), Japan (18%), South Korea (13%) and India (13%) all got top marks for rises in visitor numbers.
  • CTC’s secondarymarkets yielded mixed results in November 2014: visitor numbers to Canada climbed from Taiwan (29%), Italy (13%), the Netherlands (6%) and Hong Kong (1%), while Spain (-3%) and Switzerland (-2%) suffered some early hibernal blues.
  • The call of abroad sounded loud as Canadians took 2.4 million trips November 2014, a 5% year-on-year increase.
  • The most recent stats on Canadians travelling within their own country suggest that domestic travel is stuck in a rut, making an over-reliance on this sector a weakness for the industry.
  • The sense of unease continued to grow for Canadians in November 2014.  The Index of Consumer Confidence, released by The Conference Board of Canada, slipped 1.4 points to 82.7 in total.  
  • Americans were equally shaky over their economic prospects. The Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index tumbled 3.1 points to 91.  

The Tourism Snapshot examines statistics and travel trends up to Nov. 30, 2014, in CTC’s—and partners’—key global markets.

Read the Tourism Snapshot –November 2014 in full.

 

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Comments

It is not surprising that as businesses engage new technologies for their meetings and communications, making savings by replacing some executive travel, statistics show a decrease in travel.

It is fortunate that we remain a desirable destination for overseas visitors and, undoubtedly, many will arrive for the Pan Am games and for Canada's 150th Anniversary Celebrations.
There will be a strong focus on Toronto. In view of this, please see my email being sent now, suggesting a practical method of preserving and enhancing our economy through Billy Bishop Toronto City Centre Airport.